NUR2115 Comprehensive Plan of Care

Please see attached copy of the work.

In this third and final submission lanofp your Course Project, you will  be completing a comprehensive care plan. This written assignment should  include the following:

Comprehensive Plan of Care
  Develop a comprehensive plan of care/treatment with short and long  term goals and include safety needs, special considerations regarding  personal needs, cultural/spiritual implications, and needed health  restoration, maintenance, and promotion.

Submit your completed assignment by following the directions linked below. Please check the Course Calendar for specific due dates.

What are the Data Saying?

The DNP must have a basic understanding of statistical measurements and how they apply within the parameters of data management and analytics. In this assignment, you will demonstrate understanding of basic statistical tests and how to perform the appropriate test for the project using SPSS or other statistical programs.General Requirements:Use the following information to ensure successful completion of the assignment:Refer to “Setting Up My SPSS,” “SPSS Database,” and “Comparison Table of the Variable’s Level of Measurement,” located in the DNP 830 folder of the DC Network Practice Immersion workspace.Doctoral learners are required to use APA style for their writing assignments. The APA Style Guide is located in the Student Success Center.This assignment uses a rubric. Review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.You are required to submit this assignment to LopesWrite. Refer to the LopesWrite Technical Support articles for assistance.Directions:Set up your IBM SPSS account and run several statistical outputs based on the “SPSS Database” Use “Setting Up My SPSS” to set up your SPSS program on your computer or device. You may also use programs such as Laerd Statistics or Intellectus, if you subscribe to them.The patient outcome or dependent variables and the level of measurement must be displayed in a comparison table which you will provide as an Appendix to the paper. Refer to the “Comparison Table of the Variable’s Level of Measurement.”Submit a 1,000-1,250 word data analysis paper outlining the procedures used to analyze the parametric and non-parametric variables in the mock data, the statistics reported, and a conclusion of the results.Provide a conclusive result of the data analyses based on the guidelines below for statistical significance.PAIRED SAMPLE T-TEST: Identify the variables BaselineWeight and InterventionWeight. Using the Analysis menu in SPSS, go to Compare Means, Go to the Paired Sample t-test. Add the BaselineWeight and InterventionWeight in the Pair 1 fields. Click OK. Report the mean weights, standard deviations, t-statistic, degrees of freedom, and p level. Report as t(df)=value, p = value. Report the p level out three digits.INDEPENDENT SAMPLE T-TEST: Identify the variables InterventionGroups and PatientWeight. Go to the Analysis Menu, go to Compare Means, Go to Independent Samples tT-test. Add InterventionGroups to the Grouping Factor. Define the groups according to codings in the variable view (1=Intervention, 2 =Baseline). Add PatientWeight to the test variable field. Click OK. Report the mean weights, standard deviations, t-statistic, degrees of freedom, and p level. Report t(df)=value, p = value. Report the p level out three digitsCHI-SQUARE (Independent): Identify the variables BaselineReadmission and InterventionReadmission. Go to the Analysis Menu, go to Descriptive Statistics, go to Crosstabs. Add BaselineReadmission to the row and InterventionReadmission to the column. Click the Statistics button and choose Chi-Square. Select eta to report the Effect Size. Click suppress tables. Click OK. Report the frequencies of the total events, the chi-square statistic, degrees of freedom, and p level. Report ꭓ2 (df) =value, p =value. Report the p level out three digits.MCNEMAR (Paired): Identify the variables BaselineCompliance and InterventionCompliance. Go to the Analysis Menu, go to Descriptive Statistics, go to Crosstabs. Add BaselineCompliance to the row and InterventionCompliance to the column. Click the Statistics button and choose Chi-Square and McNemars. Select eta to report the Effect Size. Click suppress tables. Click OK. Report the frequencies of the events, the Chi-square, and the McNemar’s p level. Report (p =value). Report the p level out three digits.MANN WHITNEY U: Identify the variables InterventionGroups and PatientSatisfaction. Using the Analysis Menu, go to Non-parametric Statistics, go to LegacyDialogs, go to 2 Independent samples. Add InterventionGroups to the Grouping Variable and PatientSatisfaction to the Test Variable. Check Mann Whitney U. Click OK. Report the Medians or Means, the Mann Whitney U statistic, and the p level. Report (U =value, p =value). Report the p level out three digits.WILCOXON Z: Identify the variables BaselineWeight and InterventionWeight. Go to the Analysis Menu, go to Non-parametric Statistics, go to LegacyDialogs, go to 2 Related samples. Add the BaselineWeight and InterventionWeight in the Pair 1 fields. Click OK. Report the Mean or Median weights, standard deviations, Z-statistic, and p level. Report as (Z =value, p =value). Report the p level out three digits.Include the following in your paper:Discussion of the types of statistical tests used and why they have been chosen.Discussion of the differences between parametric and non-parametric tests.Description of the reported results of the statistical tests above.Summary of the conclusive result of the data analyses.Outputs from the statistical analysis provided as an Appendix to the paper.Comparison table of the variable’s level of measurement provided as an Appendix to the paper.Use the following guidelines to report the test results:Statistically Significant Difference: When reporting exact p values, state early in the data analysis and results section, the alpha level used for the significance criterion for all tests in the project. Example: An alpha or significance level of < .05 was used for all statistical tests in the project. Then if the p-level is less than this value identified, the result is considered statistically significant. A statistically significant difference was noted between the scores before compared to after the intervention t(24) = 2.37, p = .007.Marginally Significant Difference: If the results are found in the predicted direction but are not statistically significant, indicate that results were marginally significant. Example: Scores indicated a marginally significant preference for the intervention group (M = 3.54, SD = 1.20) compared to the baseline (M = 3.10, SD = .90), t(24) = 1.37, p = .07. Or there was a marginal difference in readmissions before (15) compared to after (10) the intervention ꭓ2(1) = 4.75, p = .06.Non-Significant Trend: If the p-value is over .10, report results revealed a non-significant trend in the predicted direction. Example: Results indicated a non-significant trend for the intervention group (14) over the baseline (12), ꭓ2(1) = 1.75, p = .26.The results of the inferential analysis are used for decision-making and not hypothesis testing. It is important to look at the real results and establish what criterion is necessary for further implementation of the project's findings. These conclusions are a start.

nurse educator, health and medical assignment help

Access the GCU Mission and Vision Statements, located on the GCU website:

http://www.gcu.edu/about-gcu/university-snapshot.php

As a GCU student how will you apply becoming a Responsible Leader in the development of: (a) Your own learning needs for your practicum experience? (b) Your own student’s development of their personal learning needs? How are you going to help your students use this mission for the contemporary job market?

Habitat Recovery Plan Preparation

Review the Habitat Recovery Plan Assignment from Week Five (Please see the attached document for an explanation of what week five’s assignment will involve.  I will list that as a separate project with a higher budget – to be due at a later date. For now you will only be selecting the species.)

Review the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recovery plans
(http://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/recovery-plans.html).
Recovery plans can be searched either by date or by species. Select
one species’ recovery plan as a model for your assignment.
Conduct preliminary research to select a habitat and potential
threatened native species from any of the following: plant, fungi,
amphibian, reptile, insect, fish, mammal, or bird. Conduct an Internet
search using the following term endangered and threatened species in
<state’s name> or search Department of Natural Resources, or use the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website.
Select two potential species to complete the assignment in Week Five.
Do not select species with an existing recovery plan.

sus370_r1_UPX_Materials_wk5_assignment.doc

Issue position essay

Week 3 Contemporary Issue Position Essay

WCU assignment icon Choose a case from the AMA Journal of Ethics Case Index and take a position. For this assignment you will evaluate the ethical arguments for or against the issue. Identify the potential legal arguments (consider current federal guidelines), indicate any potential professional code conflicts you foresee, and support your position with an explanation of your own ethical/moral foundation.

In your 2-3 page paper:

  • Identify the issue and state your ethical position.
  • How might this scenario play out or impact you in your role as a nurse practitioner?
  • Defend your position with legal, ethical, and professional evidence.
  • As part of your position, propose strategies and solutions for addressing the issues.
  • What other ethical issues does this case bring to light, if any?

Support your position with at least one scholarly source (it may be your text). Be sure to cite the article you choose, use APA format, and include a title page and reference page.

Case:

Drug Seeking or Pain Crisis? Responsible Prescribing of Opioids in the Emergency Department

Pamela L. Pentin, JD, MD

Dr. Jones is an emergency room physician in Baltimore. Late one afternoon, he sees a young woman named Marie who has come to the ER because of extreme abdominal and knee pain over the past 12 hours. Marie says that she is in great distress and rates her pain at a 10 out of 10. She says that the pain resembles that of her previous sickle cell crises and that only Dilaudid helped. She points to her abdomen and both of her knees as the sites of pain and refuses to allow Dr. Jones to touch them. Dr. Jones observes no overt swelling or redness.

Looking at her chart, Dr. Jones sees a long list of emergency department visits and admissions over the past 2 years. Marie, 25, has a diagnosis of sickle cell disease. On most ER visits, the peripheral blood smear reports were inconclusive for vaso-occlusive crisis. Notes from her hematologist comment that she is habitually noncompliant and that they have considered consulting psychiatry to help address her persistent chronic pain.

As he is leafing through the file, Dr. Jones is interrupted by his colleague, Dr. Kapoor, who recognizes the patient’s name and quips, “Good luck with her—she’s a pro at getting drugs.”

When Dr. Jones reenters the room, Marie is tearfully pleading for pain relief.

COMMENTARY

Between 1999 and the present, there has been a 300 percent increase in the prescribing of opiates in the U.S. The misuse and abuse of prescription painkillers results in approximately 500,000 emergency department visits annually [1]. In 2008 more than 36,000 Americans died from drug overdoses, most of them caused by prescription opiates [2]. More than 12 million Americans admitted using prescription opiates recreationally in 2010 [3].

How did this dilemma come about? My take is that we created it. We believed ourselves to be well-meaning, most of us having sworn to do our utmost to relieve suffering. Yet in an effort to do just that, we now find ourselves pawns in the play of a health care system in which pain complaints are managed with opiates despite enormous risks to the patient and a numerical pain scale rating carries more weight than a patient’s level of function or even consciousness; a system in which a patient complaint of poorly managed pain quickly reaches the highest level of institutional administration, and nonpractitioners tell us how to practice medicine. We joke with colleagues about “frequent flyers” for pain medications in the emergency department (ED), but we then let those patients convince us to prescribe the opiates we know will not really help them. We prescribe “a few” tablets to move patients out of our EDs, thinking that we are somehow doing less harm than prescribing “a lot” of opiates.

We had the best of intentions. In 1997, a collaborative project was initiated to integrate pain assessment and management into the standards of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (now the Joint Commission) [4]. High levels of uncontrolled pain were felt to be a public health problem, with significant physiological, psychological and financial adverse consequences to the patient and society. Patients’ “right” to have their pain managed adequately was recognized. After review by many experts and committees, JCAHO pain standards were published in 2000, effective in 2001, requiring pain assessment and management at every initial patient visit. Pain became the fifth vital sign.

The JCAHO pain standards were a remarkable innovation in compassionate patient care. But our knee-jerk response to them was misguided. As a group, we rushed to meet those standards at almost any cost. I can still hear my then-institution’s administrators when these standards first appeared, arbitrarily requiring every patient who rated their pain at 4/10 or higher, to be stopped at the exit door until their pain was better managed. Nutritionists were obliged to walk their stable, functional patients with arthritis to the ED for evaluation because their pain rating that day happened to be a “5.”

Around the same time as the JCAHO pain standards appeared, the pharmaceutical industry formulated new, long-acting opiates. In the absence of other effective treatments for nonmalignant pain, opiates initially studied and widely adopted for the management of cancer pain filled the void. Once thought “unattractive” to addicts because of its time-released coating, OxyContin was formulated in much higher doses than previous immediate-release opiates, the idea being that it would provide smooth, long-lasting pain relief. But people found ways to crush the pills to snort or inject the oxycodone within. OxyContin in particular was heavily marketed to physicians in rural areas who had patients with severe pain, but little training in pain management or the recognition of addiction and few resources to deal with that addiction when it occurred [5]. Hence was born “hillbilly heroin,” and with it a population of prescription opiate-seeking patients. By 2001 OxyContin was the bestselling name-brand opiate analgesic in the country [6].

In 2003, the FDA cited the manufacturer of OxyContin twice for misleading promotional advertisements to physicians, underplaying the addictive risks of the drug. In 2007, three executives of the company pled guilty to charges of misleading the public about the drug’s safety and risk of abuse [7]. But the deed was done and the landscape was forever changed. (Incidentally, the misrepresentation of opiate safety by manufacturers is nothing new. Recall the early days of the twentieth century when the manufacturer of heroin marketed it as a safe, nonaddictive cough suppressant in substitution for the more “addictive” morphine [8].)

The era of long-acting high dose opiates, and ensuing prescription opiate addiction, had arrived. Patient addicts quickly learned the diagnoses that could not be definitively confirmed or ruled out by examinations or test results but that precipitated rapid pain management with opiates. Patient addicts also learned that physicians had no “dipstick” to assess their pain and that their subjective reports had to be accepted. It was quite simple to claim an allergy to, or lack of relief from, nonopiate analgesics. “Headache,” “backache,” and “dental pain,” are now common complaints used by drug seekers in emergency departments and urgent care clinics because the underlying etiology for the pain is often difficult to objectively confirm [9].

Even patients with quite legitimate pain sometimes exaggerate their pain for reasons of anxiety or pseudoaddiction. In pseudoaddiction, patients may amplify reports of pain for iatrogenic reasons, because their previous reports of very real pain were not believed and they fear that pain returning. Many of us have cared for patients who incoherently mumble a pain rating of “it’s a 10, doc” as they drift into a deeply narcotized sleep. How many of us have stayed the hand of a well-meaning colleague from administering even more opiates to a sleeping “10 out of 10”?

So how do we balance the needs of patients who legitimately suffer from pain against the risks of the opiate addictions that we as practitioners have helped to create? We must start using the safety nets available to us, we must insist that our patients become our partners in their care, and we must say “no” to opiates when the risk of harm to the patient and the community exceeds the benefit to the patient.

Web-based prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) or legislation to enable them now exist in 48 states and 1 territory, allowing us to assess who else is prescribing scheduled drugs to the patients we see. Though it takes a few extra minutes of our time and the security requirements of some PMP websites make navigation slow, it is incumbent upon us to devote that extra effort to protecting our patients and the public. The information I glean from my state’s PMP never ceases to surprise.

Once we recognize from the PMP a pattern of aberrant behavior, like frequent ED visits or other doctor-shopping, it is incumbent upon us to speak with our practitioner and pharmacist colleagues about shared patients at risk. Respect for privacy does not bar communication with other practitioners when the purpose is to protect the safety of the patient or the public. And there are clearly times, as with prescription forgery or theft, when the risk of harm to the patient or community outweighs any breach of confidentiality, and a call to the police is in order. I would rather face a judge to explain my decision to violate privilege than attend the funeral of a patient who has overdosed on opiates I prescribed.

The advent of the electronic medical record (EMR) has improved communication among health care professionals immensely, but as the old adage says: “garbage in, garbage out.” If we do not carefully document what we learn about our patients, our efforts will be fruitless. We must feel empowered to enter terms such as “addiction,” “substance abuse,” “dependence,” and “doctor shopping” in bold type, underlined with flashing lights if necessary, and descriptions of relevant behavior on EMR problem lists. And we who have access to these information-laden EMRs must take the time to actually read the entries and act accordingly.

Medical care of all types, including the management of pain, is a partnership between patient and physician. Controlled substance agreements are built upon this principle. In exchange for management of their pain with opiates, many such agreements appropriately require patients to be partners in their own care by seeing only one practitioner, using only one pharmacy, taking their medication as prescribed, and avoiding other substances of abuse or sharing medication. The provision of urine or blood samples to screen for substances of abuse and ensure a patient is taking medication as prescribed is another component of the care partnership. Agreements can also be used to ensure use of essential components of pain management, such as behavioral interventions and physical therapy, which may reduce a patient’s reliance on opiates and other drugs.

In essence, we, the medical community, created patients like Marie. We swore to do our best to relieve her suffering. But we then compelled her to report her pain as a number, we taught her the number to report to trigger the flow of opiates, and we reinforced our teaching by opening the opiate faucet whenever she uttered the threshold number. We allowed pharmaceutical manufacturers to flood the market with new opiates for Marie and to mislead her and us about their safety and their risk of addiction. A critical lack of pain management resources for Marie and others, especially those who live in rural America, and our own lack of training to recognize and manage addiction, prompted us to prescribe more and more opiates to her.

Marie may have real, terrible sickle cell disease. But it is time to look beyond the surface of cases like Marie’s. She must be a partner in her own care. For a patient with previous drug-seeking behavior and questionable reliability, a refusal to allow full physical examination or blood draws should be deemed a refusal of care and precipitate a polite decline to prescribe opiates. Urine toxicology screening may yield critical information for decision making and should be employed early and often. Test results unsupportive of a vaso-occlusive crisis in Marie’s case should be reviewed with hematology colleagues before opiates are administered—acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories can be used in the interim. A psychosocial inventory should be administered, yes, even in the ED, to determine whether Marie has other reasons, such as anxiety, depression, or life events, for coming to the ED seeking opiates.

It’s also time to assess pain based upon function rather than a numerical score, even in the ED. Reports from triage staff that, for example, Marie was seen ambulating comfortably and eating a hot dog before checking in to the ED should be given high credibility.

Use of electronic media, in all its facets, should be undertaken by ED staff to ensure the safety of prescribing opiates to Marie, and when EMRs are not available paper records should be requested by fax on an accelerated basis. Review of the records of other practitioners who have seen her, queries of state PMP websites and calls to her PCP and her pharmacist are all in order before administering opiates which may not be clinically indicated. Controlled substance contracts often set forth a plan for pain crises, and these should also be consulted by practitioners before acting whenever possible.

It is time to take back the management of pain with opiates from JCAHO, from administrators, and from the pharmaceutical industry and place it where it belongs—in the hands of cautious and well-informed practitioners. And sometimes the right thing to do to is just to say “no.”

Patient Education and Ethical Issues in Today’s Health Care

The purpose of this assignment is to educate patients on their rights to privacy. Every person possesses certain rights guaranteed by law, including the rights to privacy, self-determination, and the right to accept or reject medical treatment. A professional relationship between the physician and the patient is essential for the provision of proper medical care. Understanding the rights and responsibilities of both patient and health care provider is important, as they are rooted in the law, ethics, moral principles, and religious values.Create a 500- to 750-word digital brochure for patients, providing an overview of current patient education and ethical issues in today’s h0ealth care for health care providers in your field of study. Address the following in your brochure:Explain the professional codes of ethics and standards.Describe patient/health care provider relationships and the principles that govern them. Provide at least one example from a personal experience.Describe how health care delivery has changed over time for health care professionals and patients receiving the care.Explain patient rights and responsibilities.Discuss the pervasiveness of patient abuse and identify its signs.The brochure should include graphics that are relevant to the content, visually appealing, and use space appropriately.Support your brochure with 2–3 scholarly resources.

Deliverable 4 – Art Schematic

CompetencyFormulate systems to utilize the benefits of art and apply them to everyday life and the workplace.InstructionsYour company is stressing a new philosophy: “Problem-solving is our business.” Artists use problem-solving on a daily basis. For example, a painter might have a problem of depth within a picture plane. He/She would first need to recognize the issue, then visualize a solution and execute it. As problem-solving requires critical thinking and critical thinking requires creativity, you realize you will need to keep tremendous focus if you want to excel at your job. That means idea creation, and with that, you will need to exercise those parts of the brain that stimulate new ideas. To do this, you will create hypothetical scenarios and try to solve the equations, so to speak. By engaging in this process, perhaps you will find similarities in the problem-solving paths that connect to your own life.Identify three problems that people might encounter in their everyday lives. These can be even the most basic of life’s inconveniences. For example, changing a tire.For each of these scenarios, create a timeline that maps out how to overcome these issues.For each scenario, provide three possible outcomes for each.Connect the problem-solving process of one of these scenarios to your own experience.Recognize and describe some obstacle you might encounter in your process idea creation.In the end, you should have three problems, nine solutions, one problem of your own, and possible obstacles.Grading RubricFFCBA01234No PassNo PassCompetenceProficiencyMasteryNot SubmittedStudent lists problems, but they are incomplete.Student lists problems, but lacks complete identification or explanation of some basic elements.Student lists problems, including identification of a strong majority of elements, but explanation lacks detail.Student lists problems, including identification of a strong majority of elements, and includes excellent descriptive details.Not SubmittedStudent provides timelines, but they are incomplete.Student provides timelines, but significantly underdeveloped analysis of how to overcome problems.Student provides timelines, descriptions of scenarios are clear, but lacks analysis of how to overcome problems.Student provides timelines, descriptions of scenarios are clear, analysis of how to overcome problems is provided in detail.Not SubmittedStudent provides a list of outcomes with no explanation.Student compiles example outcomes, with limited analysis or description.Student compiles example outcomes, with detailed analysis, but the communication of ideas is unclear.Student compiles example outcomes with detailed analysis, and the communication of ideas is fully developed.Not SubmittedStudent connects the scenario to a personal experience, but with no detail.Student connects scenario to a personal experience with some detail.Student connects scenario to personal experience with detail and some analysis.Student connects scenario to personal experience with extensive detail and fully developed analysis.Not SubmittedStudent only lists obstacles.Student lists obstacles with some description.Student lists obstacles with description and some analysis.Student lists obstacles with description and fully developed analysis.

Two discussion board questions about research ethics

1- Based upon the articles I attached and your own understanding please answer the following questions. Is it ethical to randomize clinical treatment trials? Meaning is it ok to hold treatment from one group and give it to another? Why is randomization important in research of a quantitative nature?

ANSWER: It removes researcher bias and improves reliability. But what ethical questions are raised? The question as stated above is whether we are withholding treatment from one group while giving it to another, whether it be a clinical drug trial or a new training tool. Is this ethical? Why or Why not?

2- What are some of the ethical or human subjects issues that may exist in your own research direction? What do you need to be careful about regarding your design? (to answer this question,

The articles:

1- https://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/international/index.html#…

3- And the articles I attached below

Important notes:

1- Use APA format for citation.

Accounting/ Financial Management Homework

Please enter answers into appropriate answer boxes in attached document.Be prepared to re-do work if innacurate/if you gave me a wrong answer for one of the questions submitted by you.The assignment consists of 22 questions.Chapter 6 homework 3 [removed][removed]1.   An investment offers $7,100 per year for 20 years, with the first payment occurring one year from now.If the required return is 7 percent, what is the value of the investment? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Present value$ [removed]What would the value be if the payments occurred for 45 years? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Present value$ [removed]What would the value be if the payments occurred for 70 years? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Present value$ [removed]What would the value be if the payments occurred forever? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Present value$ [removed]2.   If you put up $44,000 today in exchange for a 6.75 percent, 14-year annuity, what will the annual cash flow be? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Annual cash flow$ [removed]3.   If you deposit $5,500 at the end of each of the next 15 years into an account paying 11.30 percent interest, how much money will you have in the account in 15 years? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Future value$ [removed]How much will you have if you make deposits for 30 years? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Future value$ [removed]4.   You want to have $74,000 in your savings account 11 years from now, and you’re prepared to make equal annual deposits into the account at the end of each year. If the account pays 6.30 percent interest, what amount must you deposit each year? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Deposit amount$ [removed]5.   The Maybe Pay Life Insurance Co. is trying to sell you an investment policy that will pay you and your heirs $29,000 per year forever. If the required return on this investment is 5.30 percent, how much will you pay for the policy? (Round your answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Present value$ [removed]6.   The Maybe Pay Life Insurance Co. is trying to sell you an investment policy that will pay you and your heirs $20,000 per year forever. Suppose a sales associate told you the policy costs $465,000. At what interest rate would this be a fair deal? (Round your answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Interest rate[removed]%7.   Find the EAR in each of the following cases (Use 365 days a year. Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answers to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16)):Stated Rate (APR)Number of Times CompoundedEffective Rate (EAR)9.8%Quarterly[removed]%18.8Monthly[removed]14.8Daily[removed]11.8Infinite[removed]8.   Find the APR, or stated rate, in each of the following cases (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answers to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16)):Stated Rate (APR)Number of Times CompoundedEffective Rate (EAR)[removed]%Semiannually11.2%[removed]Monthly12.1[removed]Weekly9.8[removed]Infinite13.59.   First National Bank charges 14.2 percent compounded monthly on its business loans. First United Bank charges 14.5 percent compounded semiannually.Calculate the EAR for First National Bank and First United Bank. (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answers to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))EARFirst National[removed]%First United[removed]%As a potential borrower, which bank would you go to for a new loan?[removed]First National Bank[removed]First United Bank10.                     Barcain Credit Corp. wants to earn an effective annual return on its consumer loans of 14.1 percent per year. The bank uses daily compounding on its loans. What interest rate is the bank required by law to report to potential borrowers? (Use 365 days a year. Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Interest rate[removed]%Chapter 6 homework 411.                     What is the future value of $1,900 in 18 years assuming an interest rate of 7.2 percent compounded semiannually? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Future value$ [removed]12.                     Gold Door Credit Bank is offering 6.3 percent compounded daily on its savings accounts. You deposit $4,700 today.How much will you have in the account in 4 years? (Use 365 days a year. Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Future value$ [removed]How much will you have in the account in 12 years? (Use 365 days a year. Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Future value$ [removed]How much will you have in the account in 19 years? (Use 365 days a year. Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Future value$ [removed]13.                     An investment will pay you $35,000 in 10 years. If the appropriate discount rate is 6.2 percent compounded daily, what is the present value? (Use 365 days a year. Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Present value$ [removed]14.                     You want to buy a new sports coupe for $84,500, and the finance office at the dealership has quoted you a 6.6 percent APR loan for 48 months to buy the car.What will your monthly payments be? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Monthly payment$ [removed]What is the effective annual rate on this loan? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Effective annual rate[removed]%.15.                     You are planning to make monthly deposits of $310 into a retirement account that pays 9 percent interest compounded monthly. If your first deposit will be made one month from now, how large will your retirement account be in 35 years? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Future value$ [removed]16.                     You are planning to make annual deposits of $6,330 into a retirement account that pays 10 percent interest compounded monthly. How large will your account balance be in 28 years? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))FVA$ [removed]17.                     The appropriate discount rate for the following cash flows is 8 percent compounded quarterly.YearCash Flow1$90029803041,570What is the present value of the cash flows? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Present value$ [removed]18.                     The appropriate discount rate for the following cash flows is 7.58 percent per year.YearCash Flow1$2,5202033,96042,210What is the present value of the cash flows? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Present value$ [removed]19.                     You are looking at an investment that has an effective annual rate of 14.6 percent.What is the effective semiannual return? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Effective semiannual return[removed]%What is the effective quarterly return? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Effective quarterly return[removed]%What is the effective monthly return? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Effective monthly return[removed]%20.                     You want to be a millionaire when you retire in 35 years.How much do you have to save each month if you can earn an 11.8 percent annual return? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Savings per month$ [removed]How much do you have to save each month if you wait 10 years before you begin your deposits? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Savings per month$ [removed]How much do you have to save each month if you wait 20 years before you begin your deposits? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Savings per month$ [removed]21.                     Suppose an investment offers to triple your money in 36 months (don’t believe it). What rate of return per quarter are you being offered? (Round your answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Rate of return[removed]%22.                     Given an interest rate of 4.2 percent per year, what is the value at date t = 7 of a perpetual stream of $2,600 payments that begins at date t = 15? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your final answer to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))Perpetuity value$ [removed]