FNP Perspective Peer Assessment

Please respond to your peer’s posts, from an FNP perspective. To ensure that your responses are substantive, use at least two of these prompts:

  • Do you agree with your peers’ assessment?
  • Take an opposing view to a peer and present a logical argument supporting an alternate opinion.
  • Share your thoughts on how you support their opinion and explain why.
  • Present new references that support your opinions.

Please be sure to validate your opinions and ideas with in text-citations and references in APA format. Substantive means that you add something new to the discussion, you aren’t just agreeing. Be respectful and thoughtful.This is also a time to ask questions or offer information surrounding the topic addressed by your peers. Personal experience is appropriate for a substantive discussion and should be correlated to the literature.Minimum of 100 words.

Tracie Response,

Postpartum depression (PPD) is often referred to as the baby blues. It is a severe mental illness that affects a mother’s behavior and physical health. These feelings could end up in physical harm or neglect to the baby. PPD is a disorder that can often be overlooked. Risk factors for PPD include history of major depressive disorder, previous postpartum depression, or antenatal depressive symptoms (Hirst & Moutier, 2014). Screening for antepartum and postpartum depression is strongly considered by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists although there is lacking evidence that supports a universal screening (Hirst & Moutier, 2014). Individuals with identified risk factors should be screened. The most widely used scale for screening PPD is the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale. It is a ten question scale that even asks about suicidal ideation.

PPD can differ from the baby blues depending on the severity and duration of symptoms. Baby blues begin during the first two to three days after delivery and should continue for no longer than ten days. Symptoms include irritability, poor sleep, brief crying spells, and emotional reactivity (Hirst & Moutier, 2014). Baby blues do not include suicidal ideation. Preparation for postpartum care and consideration of prophylactic treatment have been recommended in these women. Prophylactic therapy may involve psychotherapy beginning in the third trimester or medication offered immediately postpartum. If a mom is displaying behavior that is indicative of self-harm to herself or the baby, this would be a good indication for a referral to counseling and a psychologist.

References

Hirst, K., & Moutier. (2014, October). Postpartum Major Depression. Retrieved from https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/1015/p926.html (Links to an external site.)

Charlie’s response

Postpartum depression (PPD) is often referred to as the baby blues. It is a severe mental illness that affects a mother’s behavior and physical health. These feelings could end up in physical harm or neglect to the baby. PPD is a disorder that can often be overlooked. Risk factors for PPD include history of major depressive disorder, previous postpartum depression, or antenatal depressive symptoms (Hirst & Moutier, 2014). Screening for antepartum and postpartum depression is strongly considered by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists although there is lacking evidence that supports a universal screening (Hirst & Moutier, 2014). Individuals with identified risk factors should be screened. The most widely used scale for screening PPD is the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale. It is a ten question scale that even asks about suicidal ideation.

PPD can differ from the baby blues depending on the severity and duration of symptoms. Baby blues begin during the first two to three days after delivery and should continue for no longer than ten days. Symptoms include irritability, poor sleep, brief crying spells, and emotional reactivity (Hirst & Moutier, 2014). Baby blues do not include suicidal ideation. Preparation for postpartum care and consideration of prophylactic treatment have been recommended in these women. Prophylactic therapy may involve psychotherapy beginning in the third trimester or medication offered immediately postpartum. If a mom is displaying behavior that is indicative of self-harm to herself or the baby, this would be a good indication for a referral to counseling and a psychologist.

Reference

Hirst, K., & Moutier. (2014, October). Postpartum Major Depression. Retrieved from https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/1015/p926.html (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Links to an external site.

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